Patient Education

Anaheim Surgical Associates would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Anaheim Surgical Associates provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Abscess Drainage

An abscess is a mass caused by a bacterial infection; it forms when a cavity fills with pus, which is a combination of dead tissue, white blood cells and bacteria. Although an abscess can develop anywhere (sometimes as a postsurgical complication), moist areas such as the armpits, groin, tailbone region (pilonidal cyst) and mouth (dental abscess) are particularly susceptible. Although some drain on their own, many abscesses require medical intervention. ...


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Adrenalectomy

An adrenalectomy is a surgical procedure in which one or both of the adrenal glands are removed. The adrenal glands are small, triangular organs on top of the kidneys which produce and release several necessary hormones and chemicals, including estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisol, cortisone, steroids, adrenalin, also known as epinephrine, and norepinephrine. ...


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Appendectomy

An appendectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the appendix, a small organ located at the junction of the small intestine and colon. The appendix, once thought to be only vestigial, is now known to help lubricate the colon and to assist the immune system. Appendectomies are, therefore, performed only when necessary. ...


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Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma a common type of skin cancer that occurs in the basal cell layer of the skin. It is the most common type of skin cancer in people with fair skin, and it usually occurs on areas of the skin that have been exposed to the sun, such as the face. Basal cell carcinoma rarely spreads to other parts of the body but is still a serious condition that requires prompt treatment. ...


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Biliary Drainage

Biliary drainage, also called percutaneous biliary drainage, is the common treatment for clearing gallstones and other blockages from the bile ducts. The bile ducts carry bile from the liver to the gall bladder and small intestine to aid in digestion.

During biliary drainage, an incision is made through the skin into the liver where a stent is placed to hold the bile duct open. A biliary drainage tube, or catheter, is then inserted to clear the bile ducts of any existing obstructions. If the bile duct is blocked by gallstones, surgery to remove the gall bladder is usually performed. In the case of cancer in the region, the bile duct may be widened during an endoscopic procedure. ...


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Cholecystectomy

Cholecystectomy is a surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. The gallbladder is responsible for collecting and releasing bile, a fluid that is used in the digestion of food and produced by the liver. A cholecystectomy is usually performed when the gallbladder is not functioning normally or if gallstones are present, causing distress to the patient. ...


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Colon Resection

A colon resection, or colectomy, is a surgical procedure to remove either part, or all, of the large intestine (colon). This procedure is performed to repair a congenital abnormality or damage caused by a disease condition, a traumatic injury or a severe infection. A colon resection may be performed as an open procedure or laparoscopically. Wherever possible, the laparoscopic procedure is preferred since it results in smaller incisions, fewer complications, and a shorter recovery period. Normally, during a colon resection, after the diseased portions of the colon are removed, the healthy ends of the colon are reattached to one another with sutures. In more serious cases, however, a colostomy may be necessary, either temporarily or permanently. ...


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Colon Resection FAQs

What is a colon resection?

A colon resection is a surgical procedure to remove either part of or all of colon, or large intestine. When the whole colon is removed, the operation is also known as a colectomy. A colon resection is performed to treat or prevent the spread of certain diseases of the colon. ...


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Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer, also known as colon cancer, develops in either the large intestine or the rectum. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Cancer occurs when healthy cells become altered, growing and dividing in a way that keeps the body from functioning normally. Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, benign clusters of cells (polyps) on the lining of the colon or rectum. Certain types of polyps, called adenomas, can become malignant. ...


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Colostomy

A colostomy is a surgical procedure performed to attach one end of the large intestine to an opening in the abdominal wall (a stoma) through which body waste drains into a bag designed for the purpose. This operation is performed when a section of the colon has to be removed due to illness, infection or injury in order to give the remaining portion of the colon a chance to heal. The procedure may be performed as a temporary measure until healing takes place, or may be a permanent solution, especially when the rectum has also been removed. ...


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Diaphragm Repair

The diaphragm is the muscle that stretches along the bottom of the rib cage and plays a crucial role in respiration. When the diaphragm is damaged, it must be immediately repaired. There are several ways in which the diaphragm may be injured, all eventually involving hiatal herniation. ...


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Gastrectomy

Gastrectomy is the surgical removal of part or all of the stomach. When gastrectomy is performed, gastric resection is required to reconnect the gastrointestinal tract so that digestion can take place as normally as possible. ...


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Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, occurs when stomach acid, used for digestion, regurgitates or refluxes into the esophagus, causing inflammation and damage to the lining of the esophagus. GERD is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux, also known as GER, a less serious form of GERD. Most people have occasional episodes of GER, but when GER becomes more frequent, occurring more than two times a week, it is classified as GERD. The stomach acid causes pain or burning in the chest or throat, known as heartburn. ...


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Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anal canal. In their normal state, these veins provide cushioning during bowel movements. They can, however, swell after lifting, straining, constipation, passing of hard stools or diarrhea, or pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are not life-threatening, but they can be painful. If swelling persists, the veins may become permanently stretched (prolapsed). ...


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Hernia

A hernia occurs when an abdominal organ, usually the small intestine, protrudes through the abdominal wall. The protruding tissue may become obstructed or incarcerated, or may strangulate. In the latter case, blood flow to the tissue is impeded and the results may be life-threatening. Hernias do not heal on their own and may be uncomfortable or painful. Surgery is the only method to correct them. Small hiatal hernias, however, can sometimes be kept at bay through diet and medication. Among the most common procedures in the United States, hernia surgery is performed to push the protruding tissue back into place and repair the weakness in the abdominal wall which allowed it to pass through. ...


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Laparoscopic Colon Resection for Cancer

A colon resection, also known as a colectomy, is a surgical procedure to remove either part of or all of the large intestine (the colon). It is used to treat both benign and malignant tumors, and is usually effective in stopping the spread of colon cancer. A colon resection is often performed using laparoscopic surgery. Often referred to as minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery is used primarily to treat early-stage cancers. ...


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Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

A laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is an operation performed to repair a ventral, or abdominal, hernia through a minimally invasive procedure. When performed laparoscopically, this surgery has advantages over traditional surgery, including: less scarring, less pain, less risk of infection, and a shorter recovery period. A ventral or abdominal hernia occurs when there is a weakness in the abdominal wall which develops a tear or hole. The hernia is created as the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the opening, forming a sac into which a portion of abdominal or intestinal tissue protrudes. A ventral hernia appears as a bulge on the outer wall of the abdomen. Ventral hernias vary in severity and may or may not require surgical repair. ...


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Laparoscopy

Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to diagnose and treat conditions in the abdominal and pelvic areas. During a laparoscopic procedure, a thin tube with a camera on the end, known as a laparoscope, is inserted through a tiny incision to allow the doctor to closely examine the organs of the area. Surgical instruments can be inserted through additional incisions to treat any identified problems or to retrieve tissue specimens. ...


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Mastectomy

A mastectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the breast(s) in a patient with breast cancer. It is one of the most commonly used and effective options for treating breast cancer because it removes all traces of cancer, and reduces the risk of its recurrence.

Types of Mastectomy

There are several different mastectomy procedures designed to eradicate the cancer but retain as much of the natural breast as possible. Some of the most commonly used techniques include: ...


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Melanoma

Melanoma is a potentially life-threatening skin cancer of the melanocytes, the cells that make melanin (brown pigment). Melanoma's fatality rate is higher than that of basal cell and squamous cell cancers; it accounts for more than 80 percent of all skin-cancer deaths. Early detection and treatment greatly increase the likelihood of cure. Performing a self-examination in front of a mirror is the best way to detect melanoma in its early stages. If melanoma is suspected, a doctor should be contacted immediately. ...


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Nissen Fundoplication

A Nissen fundoplication is a surgical procedure to tighten the lower esophageal sphincter, the valve between the esophagus and the stomach. The operation treats gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by preventing stomach acid from backing up. During the procedure, the upper end of the stomach, known as the fundus, is wrapped around the lower esophagus to strengthen the barrier between the two organs. Performed laparoscopically, the surgery requires only small incisions and results in less scarring and a shorter recovery period than an open procedure. A hiatal hernia can also be repaired during this operation. ...


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Parathyroidectomy

The parathyroid glands are four small glands located behind the thyroid that regulate the calcium level in the blood. By controlling the amount of calcium in the body, the parathyroid glands control the strength and density of the bones, as well as other systemic functions. The most common reason for a parathyroidectomy, during which one or more of the parathyroid glands is removed, is the presence of a small benign tumor, known as an adenoma. The adenoma causes an overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in hyperparathyroidism, an imbalance that can cause uncomfortable and serious symptoms. ...


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Skin Cancer

Skin cancer, which is the most common form of cancer in the United States, is the result of the abnormal growth of skin cells. Cancer can affect skin anywhere on the body, but most frequently appears on skin that is exposed to the sun. There are more than a million new cases of skin cancer in the United States each year. ...


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Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that occurs in the squamous cells of the skin. It is usually caused by excessive, long-term exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun and most frequently affects people over the age of 50. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer in people with dark skin. In dark skinned individuals, it commonly occurs in places that have not been exposed to the sun such as the legs or feet. While individuals with fair skin may have an occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma in sun exposed areas, such as on the face, head, ears and neck, it is possible to get squamous cell carcinoma on any part of the body. Squamous cell skin cancer may spread to other parts of the body, so early detection is extremely important in treating this condition. ...


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Splenectomy

A splenectomy is the surgical removal of the spleen, an organ that helps to regulate the composition of the blood and plays an important role in fighting infections. The spleen is on the left side of the abdomen near the rib cage. When part of the spleen is removed the procedure is called a partial splenectomy. In some cases, in patients with certain diseases, the spleen may shrivel up and stop functioning without intervention. This is called an auto-splenectomy. ...


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Thyroid Surgery

The thyroid gland, located in the neck just below the larynx, regulates the body's energy levels, releasing hormones to regulate metabolism. Thyroid hormones influence virtually every system in the body, regulating the rate at which organs function, as well as the body's consumption of oxygen and production of heat. When hyperthyroidism, the production of too much thyroid hormone, occurs, and cannot be adequately controlled with medication or other treatment, thyroid surgery is necessary. ...


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Tracheotomy

A tracheotomy is a surgical procedure used to make an opening in the windpipe (trachea) to remove an obstruction or allow air to pass through to the lungs. An incision is made below the vocal cords, and a plastic or metal tube is inserted to keep the incision open. The tube is usually connected to a ventilator machine that helps with breathing, although, depending on the patient's condition, a ventilator may not be needed. A tracheotomy is usually performed to alleviate breathing problems, and is often performed in emergency situations after more conservative methods have failed. ...


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Umbilical Hernia

An umbilical hernia occurs when abdominal tissue protrudes through the skin around the navel or belly button. A common congenital condition in newborns, it may also appear in adulthood, often precipitated or exacerbated by obesity, pregnancy, abdominal surgery or heavy lifting. Umbilical hernias, like other hernias, happen when part of an abdominal organ, usually the intestine, presses through a weak point in the abdominal wall. ...


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Breast Abscess

A breast abscess is a a painful mass on the breast. It presents as a pink to reddish swelling, warm or hot to the touch. Like other abscesses, it is filled with fluid and pus. Pus is a combination of bacteria, white blood cells the body sends to eradicate the bacteria, and dead tissue. The accumulation of these materials causes inflammation and pain. ...


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